Mold Cases Rising Due to Wet Weather

6:27 PM, Aug 1, 2013   |    comments
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Rain brought a cooler summer to Central Georgia, but with that wet, humid weather comes mold, and a lot of it.

Carl Goodrich, the owner of ServPro Macon, said the weather could be playing a factor in the rise of humidity.

"We have seen a lot more this summer because of all the rain we had. The ground is so saturated, so we are getting a lot of calls of water under houses' crawl spaces, that sort of thing," said Goodrich.

Goodrich says if something in your house gets saturated with water that shouldn't be, it can breed mold.

"If you have had any kind of moisture intrusion in your house, inside the house or in a crawl space, that sort of thing, that's a potential for mold to grow. It takes a few days to be able to see it visibly. Sometimes you won't see it but you smell it. That's the micro-toxins that it puts off," said Goodrich.

He said sometimes mold can breed without a saturation of water, but with increased humidity.

"People go on vacation, they think, 'Hey, I am going to save money. I am going to turn off my air conditioner.' The houses are more airtight nowadays, so there is no airflow down there. The air conditioning is off, and you get the high humidity in the 80s and 90s, that sort of thing. If it's left closed up long enough, you'll start getting mold in there," said Goodrich.

The best way to remove mold is to get rid of the item or area that has the mold.

"But they say any building material that is damaged by water has visible mold on it. It says to remove it, you can't clean it or anything like that," said Goodrich.

If you can't get rid of it, you need to get rid of moisture and dry it out.

"The things like subfloors or studs in the walls, that sort of thing, you obviously can't tear those out. Your house would fall down. You need to get them dry, either with air movers or de-humidifiers, that sort of thing. That's what we do," said Goodrich.

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