Plant Scherer Faces More Lawsuits

10:57 AM, Sep 19, 2013   |    comments
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Plant Scherer in Juliette.

Plant Scherer, a coal-burning power  plant in Juliette  faces more lawsuits today.

Macon attorney Brian Adams says the law suits were filed Wednesday on behalf of Monroe County residents and former residents against the plant .

The lawsuits are seeking damages, claiming  the plant knowingly released toxic and cancerous pollution.

The coal-fire power plant is  majority owned by Georgia Power.

Adams says his clients' health problems are widespread.

"They've got  sorts of problems, you got breathing problems, muscle problems, cancer problems not to mention property damage... claims either their property value has decreased or the material has dropped onto their property and caused damaged that way, " said Adams

Georgia Power spokesman Mark Williams declined comment on the lawsuit , but issued a statement saying"

"Georgia Power meets all applicable federal and state air emissions regulations and Georgia Power and Plant Scherer comply with all standards for air and water quality."

Vulcan Materials, a nearby quarry is also named in the lawsuit. Plaintiffs claim dust from the quarry damaged their property.

A representative for Vulcan could not be reached for comment.

The lawsuit seeks unspecified damages.

The suits were filed a day before an environmental group held a news conference Thursday to call Plant Scherer one of "America's dirtiest plants," and the nation's number-one carbon polluter.

Georgia Power's full response:

Georgia Power meets all applicable federal and state air emissions regulations and Georgia Power and Plant Scherer comply with all standards for air and water quality that are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD). Plant Scherer has operated for 30 years under permits that are issued by EPD, which assure that those standards are met.

Plant Scherer is one of the largest coal-fired electric generating plants in the United States with a total capacity of 3.27 million kilowatts. More than $2 billion has been invested in emissions control equipment at Plant Scherer, including scrubbers, Selective Catalytic Reduction units (SCRs) and baghouses. These controls will result in the reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions by more than 95 percent, nitrogen oxides emissions by more than 60 percent, and mercury emissions by more than 80 percent.

A recent scoping report done by the Georgia Department of Public Health states that the data reviewed by DPH does "not indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contamination that would be expected to cause adverse health effects."

 

 

 

 

 

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