How to detect eclipse aftermath on the eyes

Signs of eye damage due to the eclipse

Thousands of people protected their eyes as they looked to the skies Monday.

Thousands, minus one -- Wendy Neptune was a little rebellious.

"Well, it's not my first time looking at an eclipse with my eyes," Neptune said. "When they tell you not to look, of course, you wanna look, and I never had glasses so, I look for a very brief short amount of time and then I keep looking here and there."

So how does Wendy feel today? She says she feels out of this world.

"I feel stellar. It is very bright, it does kind of hurt a little, and it's my third eclipse and I do it every time."

So if you decided not to wear glasses and take glances at the sun, ophthalmologist Johnny Gayton says you're OK under certain circumstances.

"If it's just a glance, typically it's not gonna do anything," Gayton said. "It's the staring, that's what does it. What I was telling people to do is wear the protection, look for three seconds, then look away." 

If you're still concerned, Gayton says a simple eye exam will do. Gayton says symptoms such as headaches or spotty flares in your eyes that go away are nothing to worry about, but a permanent dot in your eye that covers words and faces can be a sign of permanent damage.

A simple test can be done at home called the "Amsler Grid Test," which can be found on this link: http://www.eyesight.org/Macular_Degeneration/Eye_Test/eye_test.html

 

 

© 2017 WMAZ-TV


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment