With the $1,000 grant members of the "eagle's nest" plan to visit places like worm farms and strawberry patches for that hands-on experience.

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With more than 30 years of experience combined, Andrea Seagraves and Amy Hill are the type of teachers that liked to color outside of the lines, but they say something was missing from their lesson plans.

"We weren't giving our children exactly what they needed. We live in a rural community and I was trying to figure out a way to teach them that would be pertinent to their lives," Seagraves said.

So three years ago Farm Fridays were born, but Seagraves and Hill's creativity was limited.

"Due to budget cuts and everything, field trips just weren't possible. We needed some activities for some more hands-on things for the kids, something to make it more memorable, more real to them," Hill said.

With the $1,000 grant, members of the "eagle's nest" plan to visit places like worm farms and strawberry patches for that hands-on experience.

"Anytime the school can get additional funding, especially in today's economy I'm very elated," Paris Raines.

Because when it comes to innovative teaching, Joanne Hamlin, a Farm Friday guest speaker, says there's no one more deserving of a helping hand.

"Ms. Seagraves and the lady that's with her do an outstanding job. They have taught people things that a lot of times they don't have the opportunity to learn anymore," Hamlin said.

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