Wednesday's shooting at Fort Hood served as a tragic reminder of the struggles of veterans coming home from war with issues like PTSD.

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Wednesday's shooting at Fort Hood served as a tragic reminder of the struggles of veterans coming home from war with issues like PTSD.

Gus Allbritton, a Vietnam veteran, knows it all too well. Allbritton was drafted shortly after graduating high school in Florida. He was he wasn't prepared for the emotional toll that combat would take.

After coming back from duty, Allbritton says he still had a combat mentality. He took jobs like being a police officer and bail bondsman because "the intensity was still there to live that dangerous, on the edge lifestyle."

A wake up call came for Allbritton while on duty one night. A newspaper truck backfired, and Allbritton panicked, firing six rounds in the middle of a town.

During the Vietnam Era, little was known about Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Allbritton wasn't formally diagnosed until 1984.

After moving to Georgia, Allbritton spends much of his time volunteering at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Dublin, hoping to help other veterans suffering from PTSD.

According to the V.A., a thousand veterans are diagnosed with PTSD each week.

At the Dublin hospital, a new wing was renovated a few months completely dedicated to offices for mental health treatment.

"I think our culture is being more psychologically-minded, we're more aware now about psychological health issue than ever before," says Director of Mental Health Services Matthew Geyer.

Allbritton says while a stigma still exists for PTSD, progress continues to be made. He encourages anyone needing help to seek it.

You can contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255.

Follow 13WMAZ's Tom George on Twitter @thetomgeorge

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