x
Breaking News
More () »

'A huge win for our industry': Georgia food truck vendors to pay fewer fees in 2023

Currently, vendors must pay for permits for every county they set up in, and that's a problem for food truck owners who travel to events across the state

WARNER ROBINS, Ga. — Some Georgia food truck owners worry about the high cost of fees and permits they need to operate statewide. 

Currently, vendors must pay for permits for every county they set up in, and that's a problem for food truck owners who travel to festivals and other events across the state.

Now, Governor Brian Kemp has signed a bill that will allow a single permit for operation no matter where they serve.

A trade group estimates that America’s food-truck industry brings in more than a billion dollars a year, but the truck owners say it costs money to make money.

"Some cities they ask for $1,500, $1,800 just to be there one day, and $1,800 is kind of a high price," the Cuban Island Café owner said. 

Martha Uballe and her husband Martin Barajas own and operate  Cuban Island Café. They say depending on the event and the percentage they must pay in fees, they have to adjust prices. 

"That’s another cost for us, so you know that sometimes why we raise the price a little more so we can make up to be on that end," Barajas said. 

Food truck owners often spend thousands on permits.

In addition to their business license, the Georgia Department of Public Health requires a health permit plus a separate inspection for each county.

"It’s not that the fees will go away, but now, you have one permit and that will give you the ability to operate statewide," Tony Harrison, board president of the Food Truck Association of Georgia said.  

The new law will help food truck owners and ease the burden of the health department.

"To go out and inspect a food truck that in some cases has already been inspected,10-20 times in the same year, it makes no sense and it’s not fair to the health department," he said. 

He says after lobbying for the change for years, the food truck community is happy to see the change.

"It's a huge win for our industry. We're excited, we see the health department, we're getting feedback from inspectors and the departments saying this the right thing and it’s going to relieve some of the burden on them as well," Harrison said. 

The bill passed the Georgia House unanimously and the law will go in effect in January of 2023.

Paid Advertisement

Before You Leave, Check This Out