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'Anxious as a parent': Central Georgia mom worried about rise in COVID cases after fall break

Tara Goddard-Hall has a Jones County middle-schooler. She is concerned students will return to school, sick with COVID-19.

MACON, Ga. — Fall break is just around the corner for many Central Georgia students, but not everyone is excited about it.

Tara Goddard-Hall has a Jones County middle-schooler. She is concerned students will return to school, sick with COVID-19.

"It's another break. Another opportunity for kids and families to go out and travel and mingle, and they'll all be one big happy family again when they return to school,” she said.

Right now, the Jones County School District isn’t requiring masks.

“They haven’t really had a proactive, or haven’t really taken – in my opinion – a proactive stance. It makes you really anxious as a parent,” said Goddard-Hall.

She wishes Jones County would encourage mask wearing and vaccinations, like the Bibb County School District.

“I just really applaud Bibb County Schools’ superintendent. I think he has done an excellent job in terms of protecting the students and so far, I believe Jones County could do more,” she said.

According to the district’s website, as of Friday, Bibb County had 35 coronavirus cases in their schools and facilities.

Corey Goble works in their office of security and safety. He doesn’t think they’ll have to go virtual again after the break.

“Dr. Jones had made it clear that it is his intention to have students in school, in classrooms, with teachers, learning in-person,” said Goble.

Bibb’s Fall Break starts Monday, along with Jones, Houston, Baldwin, and several other districts.

Goddard-Hall says everyone needs to work together to keep the community safe.

“It’s not parents against teachers, against schools. It’s all of us collectively working together as a community to do what we can do,” she said.

13WMAZ reached out to the Jones County School District for comment. They did not respond.

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