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No Christmas tree shortage here in Central Georgia

Thanks to supply chain issues, whether you go natural or artificial, it may be harder to find a tree in some spots around the country

BYRON, Ga. — Thanks to supply chain issues, whether you go natural or artificial, it may be harder to find a tree in some spots around the country.

According to Jamie Warner, executive director of the American Christmas Tree Association, a combination of fewer farms growing Christmas trees, as well as a surge in interest from the public contributed to the shortage.

Real or artificial? The choice might have been made easier this season for Central Georgians.

The cost of artificial trees are expected to be up by 30% to save money. A real tree might be the best bargain.

For John Herrera and his sister Ariana Herrera, nothing beats the real deal.

"I remember us having an artificial tree for many years when I was growing up. Coming out here and doing this just creates a family bond that just can't be created by purchasing an artificial one, one time," said John.

"Our Christmas feel is getting a real tree and actually decorating it. Even if it is going and watering it or even sweeping up the fallen tree branches, it's always just like the real feel of it," said Ariana.

Michael Heard, a father of two boys, loves being able to start a family tradition.

"My age is pretty typically going to go after the artificial tree. Me, I've always been that naturalist. I like coming out here and doing something like that, especially coming out here building a bond with my children," said Heard.

Christopher Michael Roberts, the operator of Roberts Tree Farm, made sure to be prepared if this day ever came. He planted extra trees years back.

"If you're in the Central Georgia area in particular, there are many, many growers and many farms here to supply Christmas trees. I don't think, in this particular area, there's a shortage at all. I think you can expect to pay about the same price as you normally do year-to-year for a fresh cut Christmas tree off of a farm," said Roberts.

"Just that little 'sugar on top,' it's just one of those things that really gets you in the mood," said Heard, which is something you can't put a price on. 

Roberts says you should expect similar prices to last year at his tree farm in Byron ranging from $50 to $65 for a 6- to 8-foot tree.