VIENNA, Georgia — A Vienna woman stays resilient after suffering two heart attacks and a stroke in the same week. After we shared a post on our Facebook page asking what you want to be remembered for, Felicia Young said her love for cooking. 

"I'm really well known for homemade cinnamon rolls, well a few things," Young said. 

If you said Young loves baking, that would be an understatement.

"Cooking brings me peace, if I'm upset or my blood pressure is high, I can get in the kitchen and start cooking," Young said. 

Young says baking and cooking have been a coping mechanism for her since 2013.

"When my parents passed away, my mom died, and I think I cooked everything in my kitchen from breakfast to dinner from lunch to dessert," Young said. 

To help grieve and heal, Young took her cooking skills to the classroom.

"South Georgia Tech is right down the road from me, five minutes, so let me go see what the culinary program is about," Young said. 

After enrolling in culinary school, her health took a turn for the worse in 2017.

"Then I had that heart attack that night, but by the time I made it the hospital, it was over and done, they did not see anything, they sent me back home," Young said. 

The next day Young graduated, but by Wednesday she was back in hospital. 

"This time when I made it, I was in full-blown heart attack, I had to get to Phoebe (Emergency Center), within five minutes of rolling up, I was on the table," Young said. 

After having a stent installed, Young was discharged.

"That Friday they got ready to release me, and I couldn't get out of my vehicle, that is when they told me I had a stroke," Young said. 

Within one week of having two heart attacks and one stroke, Young felt defeated.

"I truly did have a moment when I gave up," Young said. 

Instead of throwing in the towel, Young took on a new job an instructor encouraged her to apply for. 

"They told me what they were going to pay me an hour, and I said, 'Oh is that the interview?' They were like, 'Oh yeah, I already know your work, you are good,'" Young said. 

"She took time for her, but she kept going with her school, she kept working and for her it ended up wonderful," Julie Partain, Dean of Enrollment Management at the Crisp County Center for South Georgia Technical College, said.

Young hopes her story teaches everyone that like cooking, sometimes life is a process. She is now working on getting her business technology degree.

If you would like to taste one of her sweet treats you can click here.

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