MACON, Ga. — After the Vietnam War, Congress wanted to make sure veterans had resources to help them transition back to civilian life. One of those resources is the Macon Vet Center.

"I joined the United States Army right out of high school in 1979," said Jerry Long. He says he proudly served the U.S. for more than two decades.

"I've been to numerous places, numerous conflicts, and operations," Long said. 

The Army veteran says after seeing the world, he decided to change gears.

"We just decided to relocate to Macon, Georgia," Long said. 

Though he's retired, he says he still felt the need to serve.

"I am the veterans outreach program specialist," Long said. 

The vet center was formed back in June 1979 for Vietnam Veterans.  

"It was a difficult time back then, so they needed a place to tell their stories," Long said. 

Today, the Macon Vet Center offers mental health services, family, and bereavement counseling -- all on wheels.

Long says he spends a lot of time on the bus, and it goes to more than 70 cities from Milledgeville all the way down to Savannah.

"There are over 80 mobile vet centers throughout the United States. There are two in Georgia," Long said. 

The center provides counseling through video chat technology, satellite phones and a computer. It allows vets to get help from resources across the country.

Long says even though work keeps him busy, his duty to help his comrades is a lifetime commitment. 

"Help that veteran out, when it is all said it done, it is about helping other veterans out," he said.

EVENT DETAILS:

40th Anniversary of the Vet Center

Friday, June 14th 2019 from 10:30 a.m. - 3:30 pm.

Macon Vet Center

750 Riverside Drive

Macon, Ga 31201

Open to Veterans, active duty service members, their families and the interested public.

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